Vine land – Barsuglia Farms http://barsugliafarms.com/ Fri, 13 May 2022 01:35:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://barsugliafarms.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Vine land – Barsuglia Farms http://barsugliafarms.com/ 32 32 Yuga Labs’ Bored Apes disrupted Ethereum with land sale https://barsugliafarms.com/yuga-labs-bored-apes-disrupted-ethereum-with-land-sale/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/yuga-labs-bored-apes-disrupted-ethereum-with-land-sale/ Airbnb will now be completely different. Users will be able to filter homes by 56 categories, including style, location or proximity to activities like skiing, camping and golf. The filters will include boats, cabins, “amazing pools”, lakes, tropical locations and vineyards, among others. “We’re reimagining travel in a way that’s less transactional and more experiential,” […]]]>

Airbnb will now be completely different. Users will be able to filter homes by 56 categories, including style, location or proximity to activities like skiing, camping and golf. The filters will include boats, cabins, “amazing pools”, lakes, tropical locations and vineyards, among others.

“We’re reimagining travel in a way that’s less transactional and more experiential,” Blecharczyk, Airbnb’s chief strategy officer, told Protocol.

Blecharczyk said clients began seeking longer stays and more and more unconventional homes like boats and barns as they moved away from office work. Blecharczyk said the redesign reflects that shift: People care more about the vibe of a place when they plan to work there for an extended period of time.

“Many employers say they will adopt at least a hybrid type policy, which means that employees will continue to have the option of working from home or working from any home for that matter,” a- he declared.

Airbnb Split Stays – CDMX and Copenhagen

Image: Airbnb

Nights booked for unique homes like tiny homes, barns, domes and treehouses were up 80% in the first quarter compared to 2019, the company said. Fewer people are also looking for trips to popular cities: Stays booked in Airbnb’s major cities accounted for 8% of its revenue in the first quarter, compared to 12% in the first quarter of 2019.

Changing Airbnb’s search, finding hidden gems is the default experience; not something users have to wade through listings to find.

“[People] are going to continue to have the flexibility to not just work from home, or from any home,” he said. “If people knew they could have this great week in the countryside and they saw the right option, they would go for it. It doesn’t matter if they arrive on a Friday or a Tuesday. It would start with “What is the experience?”

Airbnb is also offering a new feature called Split Stays, which will allow users to split their trips between multiple locations. For example, a user looking for campgrounds could use Split Stays to find locations in campgrounds that are close to each other.

“One of the challenges when you want a house for a longer stay, say, a month-long stay, is that house actually has to be available for that entire time,” Blecharczyk said. “Of course these houses are popular, maybe someone else is staying there. The longer you want to stay, the fewer options you will see when you search.


Airbnb AirCover – New booking and welcome message

Image: Airbnb

He said Split Stays would give people who want to travel longer more options. Airbnb expects people to see 40% more listings using the feature than without.

Airbnb is also launching AirCover, a program for guests that offers reservation protection if a host cancels a stay and a 24/7 security line with “specially trained agents.” AirCover for Hosts already provides damage protection and liability insurance and is separate from the new version for Guests.

The company’s security line has always been available, but Blecharczyk said it is expanding to cover 16 different languages ​​as Airbnb expects an increase in international travel this summer.

“There’s a lot of pent-up demand for cross-border travel,” Blecharczyk said. “As people take longer trips that involve more distance, more money, we want them to have peace of mind.”

]]>
Lone Star Land Steward Ecoregion Award Winners Announced https://barsugliafarms.com/lone-star-land-steward-ecoregion-award-winners-announced/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:49:30 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/lone-star-land-steward-ecoregion-award-winners-announced/ Austin, Texas – The Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife (TPWD) is proud to reveal the winners of the 2022 Lone Star Land Steward Ecoregion Award. This year’s winners represent a variety of conservation goals and achievements , all of which demonstrate excellence in natural resource management and stewardship. The annual banquet celebrating the Lone […]]]>

Austin, Texas – The Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife (TPWD) is proud to reveal the winners of the 2022 Lone Star Land Steward Ecoregion Award. This year’s winners represent a variety of conservation goals and achievements , all of which demonstrate excellence in natural resource management and stewardship.

The annual banquet celebrating the Lone Star Land Steward Award winners will take place this year at 6 p.m. on May 25. More information about the banquet, as well as a video playlist highlighting last year’s winners, can be found on the Lone Star Land Steward page of the TPWD website.

The Lone Star Land Steward Awards recognize private landowners in Texas for their exemplary contributions to land, water and wildlife management. With 95 percent of Texas land under private ownership, the conservation and stewardship efforts of private landowners are vitally important to all Texans.

Here is a list of this year’s Ecoregions award recipients and a summary of their stewardship achievements:

Blackland Prairie – Ebel Grasslands Ranch (Hopkins County)

Karl, Kelli, Christian and William Ebel

The Ebel Grassland Ranch restoration project began in 2003 with an initial purchase of 645 acres. The family added 360 acres in 2012. The total acreage of the Ebels had been cultivated and grazed for years, beginning around 1834. The family worked closely with TPWD biologists to discover that at least 780 acres of the property were remnants of the original tallgrass, Silveus’ gout seed prairie, one of the endemic native plant communities rarest in Texas. Through land management practices that focus on returning the land to the native prairie ecosystem, the family has been able to increase native flora and fauna, improve soil health and wildlife diversity on the property while running a full-time livestock operation.

Cross Timbers – Wagley Ranch (Palo Pinto County)

Jay and Sue Wagley

The Wagley family has a long history in Palo Pinto County and manages their ranch with a long-term perspective with an emphasis on maintaining and improving their native grasses and pollinating plants. When making a decision about the ranch, they ask the question, “Will this benefit the ranch for future generations?” The Wagleys base every decision on striking a balance between cattle grazing and wildlife habitat management. The Wagleys take great pride in their Black Angus herd and the fact that the whole family is involved in running the ranch. They also take great pride in the diversity of terrain, habitat and wildlife that supports the northernmost breeding range of the Golden-cheeked Warbler. Their long-term approach to land stewardship ensures that the unique wildlife species that inhabit the property have a home for years to come.

Gulf Coast Grasslands – Grahmann Family Ranches (Victoria and Goliad Counties)

Johnny and Susan Grahamman

Grahmann Family Ranches (Flycatcher Cattle) is a small cattle and wildlife operation that raises commercial and registered Brangus cattle on four properties. The overall goal of the Grahmann family is to be the best possible stewards of the land, wildlife, and livestock on their relatively small parts of Texas. Managing and restoring habitat for wildlife and livestock is the family’s top priority, using management efforts such as counting browse stalks, managing wildlife population, restoring grasslands and riparian areas. When not working diligently on their own property, the Grahmann family is always willing to lend a hand to neighbors or other private landowners, by sharing farm equipment or advice, which in many many cases, is reciprocal on the part of these same landowners. In addition, each hunting season, the family makes a point of introducing aspiring hunters and conservationists to the outdoors, most of whom are young or minority audiences.

High Plains – Grotegut Farm and Ranch (Deaf Smith County)

Chris, Chris Sr., Josef, Gertrud and Judith Grotegut

Dr. Chris Grotegut, a local veterinarian, farmer and rancher, operates under his philosophy of “living by the means of water” – that is, sustainable and responsible irrigation, livestock grazing and management practices pastures. Recognizing the unique challenges faced by land producers in the southern high plains, namely wind erosion, severe drought events and a rapidly depleting aquifer, Grotegut Farm and Ranch is a model of sustainable land production practices that use native grasses to replenish rangelands and playas. on their property

Edwards Plateau – Natural Bridge Caverns and Wuest Ranch (Comal, Bexar Counties)

Wuest Family

The Wuest family has used a combination of tools on the Wuest Ranch for many years, including rotational cattle grazing, brush management, and reseeding with native range plants. Thanks to the extensive efforts put in place by the family, native grasses and herbaceous plants are flourishing on the property, livestock productivity has increased, the family has seen an increase in the quality of white-tailed deer, small mammals and reptiles , and greatly improved the soil of the property. and water quality. Additionally, hundreds of thousands of Texas citizens can enjoy the limestone geology of their property and learn about Texas history, geology, hydrology, and beautiful open spaces while visiting. Much of the property has been under a conservation easement since 2005, meaning it will sit undeveloped in perpetuity in one of the fastest urbanizing areas in Texas.

Rolling Plains – Indian Springs Cattle Company (Moore County)

Mitchell family

Before the Mitchell family purchased this property in the Canadian River Breaks, it was heavily overgrazed. Since the development of a detailed grazing plan, the diversity of native plants has responded exponentially to the care and stewardship of the family. Over the past six years, the predominance of grass types on the ranch has shifted to high quality bluestem and vine mesquite, among others, indicating a healthy short and mixed grass prairie. In addition, the property’s livestock carrying capacity has greatly exceeded its previous state while providing abundant habitat to meet the cover, food, water and space needs of grassland birds, small mammals, reptiles, predators and quality big game species. The ranch often lends itself to cooperative research, demonstration, and education programs that promote good wildlife and habitat management practices for private landowners who own and manage land in the area. Their management benefits all who use Lake Meredith just downstream.

Trans Pecos – Quail Ranch (Upton County)

Concho Resources Inc.

In a 16-inch rainfall area, it can be difficult to reclaim heavily impacted land, but that’s exactly what happens at Quail Ranch. Part of the prolific Permian Basin, reclaiming retired oilfield facilities and reseeding rights of way with native seed from local sources is a primary focus of Quail Ranch operations. This collection of Upton County properties that make up the Quail Ranch includes the ranch where famed Western Texas author Elmer Kelton was raised. Historically used for agricultural production, today the focus of land use has shifted to wildlife management after a century of diminishing grass and increasing creosote bush and mesquite. The property includes two large restored playa lakes and once brush-covered meadows that have been effectively treated and now serve as vital habitat for pronghorn, burrowing owl and black-tailed prairie dogs. Windmills have been converted to solar and energy guzzlers have been installed to ensure that over 95% of the ranch will fall within a mile of a water source. In an area providing enormous amounts of power to the public, Quail Ranch has dramatically improved the habitat for the wildlife species that inhabit this part of Texas.

Underwriters for the 2022 Lone Star Land Stewards Awards include Presenting Underwriter, Toyota; Gold Level Underwriters, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Cox, Jr, Dallas Safari Club, Jimmie Ruth and Dick Evans, Partners for Fish & Wildlife – US Fish & Wildlife Service, HE Butt Foundation, Shield Ranch; Silver Level Underwriters ConocoPhillips, Eric Walsh – Compass Ranch & Land Real Estate, King Land & Water, Lower Colorado River Authority, The Rosewood Corporation, Trinity River Authority of Texas, Wexford Ranches, Matt and Peggy Winkler; Bronze Level Underwriters 4K Land and Cattle Co., Alum Creek Wildlife Management Association, Birdwell & Clark Ranch, The Bamberger Foundation, The Brown Ranch, Danny and Shirley Butler, Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, Capital Farm Credit, Colorado River Land Trust, Conservation Equity Partners LLC, Glen and Heidi Couchman, David S. Crow, Dorothy Drummer & Associates, Dunn O’Connor Land & Cattle Co. LLC, East Foundation, Harkins Ranch, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kelsey, Oncor Electric Delivery, Republic Ranches LLC, M. Nelson J. Roach, San Antonio River Authority, Simms Creek Wildlife Association, Simon and Louise Henderson Foundation, Spicewood Ranch/Christopher Harte and Will Harte, Sycamore Canyon Ranch, Three Mile Creek Ranch, TLL Temple Foundation, Ellen C. Temple, Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas A&M Forest Service, Texas A&M Natural Resource Institute, Texas Agricultural Land Trust, Texas State Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Texas Farm B Office, Texas Land Trust Council, Texas Tech University Center at Junction Llano River Field Station, Texas Wildlife Association, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Mr. and Mrs. Warren and Dori Blesh, Wildlife Consultants, LLC, David Yeates, MJ David Bamberger; Mr. James K. Brite, Jr. (JA Brite Ranch), Mr. and Mrs. Rod Hench (Wild Wings Ranch), Mr. and Mrs. Roy Leslie (Leslie Ranch), Mr. and Mrs. Tom Vandivier (Llano Springs Ranch, Ltd .) and Mr. Kelly Walker (Walker 7 Oaks Ranch).

Learn more about the Lone Star Land Stewards program and private land stewardship on the TPWD Private Land and Habitat Program website.

]]>
Baddaginnie Run Wines shows how to nurture the land to be more sustainable with native plants bear fruit in the Strathbogie Ranges of Victoria, Australia https://barsugliafarms.com/baddaginnie-run-wines-shows-how-to-nurture-the-land-to-be-more-sustainable-with-native-plants-bear-fruit-in-the-strathbogie-ranges-of-victoria-australia/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:18:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/baddaginnie-run-wines-shows-how-to-nurture-the-land-to-be-more-sustainable-with-native-plants-bear-fruit-in-the-strathbogie-ranges-of-victoria-australia/ But as important as the environmental motivation for their work is, they realized there was another potential benefit to regenerating the land: it can produce more distinctive wines – wines that tell a clearer story of the country in which they live. are cultivated. Snow worked with international wine consultant Ken Chase, a longtime friend […]]]>

But as important as the environmental motivation for their work is, they realized there was another potential benefit to regenerating the land: it can produce more distinctive wines – wines that tell a clearer story of the country in which they live. are cultivated.

Snow worked with international wine consultant Ken Chase, a longtime friend and colleague, to research how the microbial population of specific vineyards and regions, particularly yeasts in the soil and on vines and grapes, can bring distinctive flavors – characters that we associate with the terroir – to the wines from these sites.

Baddaginnie Run has blossomed in all sorts of ways from its former state of “nearly expired” land.

A growing body of research around the world also shows that the type of agricultural and land management practices followed at Baddaginnie Run help to improve the health, diversity and resilience of this vineyard microbial population and enhance this expression of terroir.

In 2019, Winsome, Snow and Ken decided to put this research into practice. Most of the grapes harvested each year from the Baddaginnie Vineyard are sent to be made under contract by leading local winemaker Sam Plunkett in Seymour.

But in 2019, they also saved a parcel of Shiraz grapes and turned it into wine at the vineyard, allowing wild yeasts to initiate fermentation, rather than commercial cultured yeasts, as most winemakers do. Australians.

The result is fascinating: tasted side by side, the spontaneously fermented wine stands out clearly from the wine made from the same grape offsite.

For Winsome and Snow, it was particularly exciting. As well as producing what they describe as the best wine they have released so far, the exercise was a heartening validation of all the efforts they have made to regenerate the landscape here over the past four decades.

Baddaginnie Run Tasting

2021 Baddaginnie Run Verdelho [Strathbogie Ranges]
I have to admit that Verdelho is generally not one of my favorite grape varieties. I find that its inherent golden tropical fruit flavor can be a bit overdone if not handled carefully by the winemaker. This, however, is a very good white wine. Yes, there’s a lot of pineapple scent, but it’s balanced by delicious, savory and complex textural qualities. Like all the wines reviewed here, it’s also great value. $22

Baddaginnie Run Rosé 2021 [central Victoria]
Made from Grenache grapes, gently pressed and cold fermented, this is a very fine, very pale, crisp and dry rosé, with crisp berry flavors that jump on the tongue and a slightly spicy, slightly grassy complexity. It would be delicious with a fish stew, and it’s also great for watching the sun go down from the veranda. $25

Baddaginnie Run Wild Ferment Shiraz 2019 [Strathbogie Ranges]
I tasted this in a blind range that also included the “standard” 2019 Baddaginnie shiraz (made by Sam Plunkett in Seymour). This latter wine is good, with lots of bold plum fruit and good earthy tannins. But I was more drawn to that, the wine fermented with ambient yeasts in the vineyard. There is liveliness, a youthful expressiveness of the fruit and a beautiful harmonious flow of tannins. Delicious Syrah. $30

baddaginnierun.net.au

]]>
All lantern switch locations in Kirby and the Forgotten Land https://barsugliafarms.com/all-lantern-switch-locations-in-kirby-and-the-forgotten-land/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/all-lantern-switch-locations-in-kirby-and-the-forgotten-land/ In Kirby and the Forgotten Land, Kirby just wants to watch the world burn (as long as that burn is contained within those four Lantern Switches). Kirby and the Forgotten LandCute platformer levels each contain a variety of optional objectives for players to tackle while completing the level itself. If you’re trying to achieve 100% […]]]>

In Kirby and the Forgotten Land, Kirby just wants to watch the world burn (as long as that burn is contained within those four Lantern Switches).


Kirby and the Forgotten Land turn on all featured lantern switches

Kirby and the Forgotten LandCute platformer levels each contain a variety of optional objectives for players to tackle while completing the level itself. If you’re trying to achieve 100% completion, you’ll need to commit to each of these goals.

Related: Kirby and the Forgotten Land: Every Secret Natural Plains Objective

On the second level of the natural plains Region, Through the tunnel, you’ll need to find and turn on all of the lantern switches to complete one of these optional objectives. To do this, you’ll need the flame ability to blow fire into the empty lanterns, illuminating the surrounding areas. If you’re desperate for these lanterns, here’s a visual guide to all of their locations.

GAME VIDEO OF THE DAY

Where to find the lantern switches


Kirby and the Forgotten Land get the flame ability in the tunnel

Before looking for the lanterns, make sure you get the flame ability from the fire enemy at the start of the level, just before entering the tunnel. If you lose the flame ability during your search, don’t worry: flame enemies are thankfully plentiful throughout the level.

The first lantern switch


Kirby and the Forgotten Land Fire Switch Number One Fire Lantern

Once you have the flame ability, the first lantern switch is located just after near the tunnel entrance. The lantern is in a corner, in front of a vine-covered fence. Blow fire into it to light the lantern, causing the secret objective to appear in your checklist.

The second and third lantern switches


Kirby and The Forgotten Land Second Flame Lantern Switch Location

The second and third lanterns both can be found right after going through a star gate into a new area with spiked floating obstacles and rising platforms.


Kiryb and Forgotten Land's Third Flame Lantern Switch

There is a lantern in each corner of this room: one before heading to the rising platforms and one just after the rising platforms, in a corner behind a barrier. Again, you have to blow fire on them to light them up and add them to your checklist.


The Fourth Lantern Switch


Kirby and The Forgotten Land Fourth Flame Lantern Switch

The fourth and final lantern switch is only a little further beyond the third lantern, surrounded by sensitive spike balls on a rising platform. Wait for the platform to reach the right height to breathe fire into the lantern. Do this from a distance to ensure you don’t get hit by the spiked bullets.

If you have followed this guide and illuminated the four lanterns along the way, this objective will now be checked in level missions.

Next: Kirby and the Forgotten Land: Complete Guide


Fuse in Apex Legends

You sleep on Apex Legends 30-30 repeater

Read more


About the Author

]]>
Governor Youngkin signs bill allowing Sunday hunting on state public lands https://barsugliafarms.com/governor-youngkin-signs-bill-allowing-sunday-hunting-on-state-public-lands/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/governor-youngkin-signs-bill-allowing-sunday-hunting-on-state-public-lands/ RICHMOND, Virginia – Governor Glenn Youngkin this week signed SB8, introduced by Senator Chap Petersen, to allow Sunday hunting on public lands more than 200 meters from places of worship. Previously, wildlife management areas and national forests were only open to hunters every other day of the week except Sunday. “This legislation encourages Virginians to […]]]>

RICHMOND, Virginia – Governor Glenn Youngkin this week signed SB8, introduced by Senator Chap Petersen, to allow Sunday hunting on public lands more than 200 meters from places of worship. Previously, wildlife management areas and national forests were only open to hunters every other day of the week except Sunday.

“This legislation encourages Virginians to take full advantage of the many outdoor opportunities our great Commonwealth has to offer,” said Governor Youngkin. “This legislation will open up new opportunities for hunters to enjoy the sport they love.”

The board of directors of the Ministry of Wildlife Resources passed a resolution last fall supporting changes to the law to allow hunters access on Sundays. Virginia sportsmen are a significant economic force – spending more than $1.5 billion, supporting more than 39,160 jobs, generating more than $1.17 billion in wages and salaries, and $242 million in state and local taxes .

SB8 will provide the next generation of sportsmen with another weekend day during hunting seasons to recreate safely, while ensuring the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources has strong funding to do great conservation work in the whole Commonwealth. With Governor Youngkin’s signature, the legislation will take effect July 1, 2022.

.

]]>
SunGold/G3 Licenses – Investment or Taxable Land Improvement? https://barsugliafarms.com/sungold-g3-licenses-investment-or-taxable-land-improvement/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/sungold-g3-licenses-investment-or-taxable-land-improvement/ Arborists growing crops under exclusive licenses will closely watch a rating assessment case in the High Court in June. In 2021, as part of the triennial reassessment of district ratings, Gisborne District Council (GDC) introduced the value of kiwifruit licenses (SunGold/G3) into the land improvements portion of the capital assessment (CV ) of a property. […]]]>

Arborists growing crops under exclusive licenses will closely watch a rating assessment case in the High Court in June.

In 2021, as part of the triennial reassessment of district ratings, Gisborne District Council (GDC) introduced the value of kiwifruit licenses (SunGold/G3) into the land improvements portion of the capital assessment (CV ) of a property.

The increase in CV, and therefore the increase in rates, has been significant for growers of this variety. In its communication on GDC’s long-term plan, the New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Institute (NZKGI) provided some examples of increases seen by growers in the region:

NZKGI brought judicial review proceedings against GDC in the High Court challenging the inclusion of the G3 licenses for the purpose of fixing the rateable value of the land and therefore the rates. Two claims are advanced by NZKGI:

1. That the G3 licenses do not correspond to the value of the land as defined in the Rating Valuations Act 1998 (RVA). On this basis they are irrelevant to the assessment of the value of the land and the Board would have erred in adopting assessments which included the value of the licenses; and

2. There was a breach of natural justice because GDC’s policy was adopted based on a January 2021 statement by the Appraiser General that the value of G3 licenses should be included in appraisals of rating. It is alleged that the improper procedure was followed by the Council because the producers were not given the opportunity to be heard.

A Gisborne producer, the Bushmere Trust, has also filed an objection to its valuation with the Land Valuation Tribunal (Valuation Tribunal). Judicial review proceedings in the NZKGI High Court have been stayed, pending a decision by the Tribunal on the Bushmere Trust’s objection to its valuation.

The Bushmere Trust property is relatively modest in size, with approximately 3.11 hectares of orchard canopy, and includes planted G3s and rootstocks for future planting of red Zespri. But it has come to represent a ‘test case’ not only for the other 49 G3 licensed growers in the Gisborne district, but will likely also be watched closely by other G3 growers across Nova Scotia. Zeeland, including the Bay of Plenty. and Northland.

The ultimate issue before the Valuation Tribunal was whether the value of the G3 permit (as opposed to rootstock or other improvements) is an improvement of the land within the meaning of the definition of “improvements” in the Rating Valuations Act. , and can be evaluated accordingly.

The Valuation Tribunal recently rendered its decision and concluded that the G3 permits were not “an improvement or benefit to the land” (and therefore should not be included in the assessed value); the Assessment Tribunal concluding:

1. The licenses represent a “speculative investment” by the owner with the prospect of increasing income from the exploitation of the orchard;

2. License cannot be transferred with ownership and requires a new contract with Zespri; and

3. The license can, and in some cases has been, transferred and the cultivars removed from the rootstock. The rootstock is still available for use by other unlicensed or licensed kiwifruit species.

We understand that GDC, supported by the Valuer-General, has appealed the Valuation Tribunal’s decision to the High Court; and that the Valuer-General will join the proceedings as an interested party. A statement on the Council’s website indicates that the Assessor General considers the decision of the Assessment Tribunal to be, “inconsistent with previous court rulings and the requirement of the Rating Valuations Act of 1998 to assess established vines as improvements. Removing the value of the golden kiwi vine due to the existence of a license creates an inequitable outcome for ratepayers, unfairly reducing the burden of assessment and tariffs for some owners and increasing the burden on rates for others.

The High Court proceedings are currently due to be heard in early June.

]]>
An essay from Reflections of The Land https://barsugliafarms.com/an-essay-from-reflections-of-the-land/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 19:55:53 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/an-essay-from-reflections-of-the-land/ Fearing porosity, we burn our bridges. Like Sidaway Bridge, Cleveland’s only suspension bridge, spanning 680 feet and once connecting a black neighborhood to a white neighborhood. It was damaged and burned in the midst of what is obliquely called the “racial tension” of the 1960s; it is more accurate to describe these events as repeated […]]]>

Fearing porosity, we burn our bridges. Like Sidaway Bridge, Cleveland’s only suspension bridge, spanning 680 feet and once connecting a black neighborhood to a white neighborhood. It was damaged and burned in the midst of what is obliquely called the “racial tension” of the 1960s; it is more accurate to describe these events as repeated assertions of white supremacy during the height of the civil rights movement. The city never fixed it, and now it’s also a ruin, a memorial, a testament to that time and all the time since, cables hanging from the vine seen from the transit line on the way Besides.

“Haunted places are the only ones where people can live,” says Michel de Certeau. Porous places are haunted places, where buildings were almost always something else, and wastelands evoke the presence of memory through the absence of what was there before. But haunted does not mean dead; instead, the haunted places crackle with the energetic collisions of noisy ghosts, inviting the rest of us to see and make history worthy of their din.

The twisted river itself can cut the city in two, but it’s also a jagged point that holds us together; its bridges feed the streets of the industrial valley, beautiful sutures spanning the city’s original thoroughfare. We are connected. We are porous. We are broken and we are beautiful; we have so many places where light enters.

Quotes:

Benjamin, Walter, EFN Jephcott and Peter Demetz. Reflections: Essays, aphorisms, autobiographical writings. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1978. Print.

Benjamin, Walter and Rolf Tiedemann. The Arcades project. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press, 1999. Print.

Certeau, Michel de and Steven Rendall. The practice of daily life. Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1988. Print.

]]>
Ground transfers, March 31-April 6 https://barsugliafarms.com/ground-transfers-march-31-april-6/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 00:35:23 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/ground-transfers-march-31-april-6/ The trend in the real estate market in Allen County is illustrated in the following report, for the week of March 31 through April 6. Figures reflect the sale price of the property, as well as the address or lot number of the property and are courtesy of Allen Office of County Recorder Mona Losh. […]]]>

The trend in the real estate market in Allen County is illustrated in the following report, for the week of March 31 through April 6. Figures reflect the sale price of the property, as well as the address or lot number of the property and are courtesy of Allen Office of County Recorder Mona Losh.

CITY OF LIMA

Bankston, Desiree to Healey, Jermonte, 330 Prospect Ave., Lima, $24,200

Beggins, Brad Successor Trustee/John E. Beggin Living Trust to 1590 Northwest LLC, 1131 W. North St., Lima, $115,000

Bolden, Lavor to Grant, Don, 532 Holmes Ave., Lima, $1,000

Carp, Morgan E/Carp, Joshua M to Scott, Brian A/Simon, April D, 1811 W. Spring St., Lima, $147,000

Chiles, Nathanial to Williams, Eva, 306 E. Vine St., Lima, $12,100

Coleman-James, Patricia/James, Manuel to Reedy, Rosie, 212 W. 11th St., Lima, $1,000

Crites, Nicholas D/Crites, Gail G to Wieging, Kendra S, 506 Columbia Drive, Lima, $137,900

Gresham, Alexander A to Guzman, Kevin J Montes/Montes, Britney M/Nickerson, Betty M, 2970 Jenny Place, Lima, $166,800

Houston, Ahmad to Blue Tulips Logistics & Transportation, LLC, 335 McDonel St., Lima, $19,000

Lima Land Company Ltd. to Schuh, Anthony J/Schuh, Taylor A, 1326 W. Market St., Lima, $36,000

McBeth, Melissa F/Raines, Heather F/Raines, Scott/McBeth, Jeremy to Allen, Andrew, 717 S. Atlantic Ave., Lima, $1,000

Miller McWay, Clara Mae/Sheriff Mathew B Treglia/McWay, Martin H Et Al to Jones, Brian M Jr, 455 N. Kenilworth Ave., Lima, $30,000

Owens, Brittany L/Owens, Kenneth N to Tummel, Maranda Renee, 716 Westbrook Drive, Lima, $180,000

Saine, Philip R/Saine, Rebecca R at Saine, Christopher P/Saine, Chasity W, 650 Ewing Ave., Lima, $49,100

AMANDA TOWNSHIP

Grigsby, Amy R/Grigsby, William B Jr to Quad R Investments, LLC, South Conant Road, Lima, $6,000

Wade, Christopher J to Place, Duane C/Place, Pamela S, 1150 Cremean Road, Lima, $225,900

AMERICAN TOWNSHIP

Bendy Properties LLC at Hawk, Susan E, 2275 N. Cable Road, Unit 103, Lima, $88,000

Butler’s Investment Properties Co. in Loman, Zaccoria J, 2311 N. McDonel St., Lima, $131,000

Peters, David/Peters, Anna to Jankow, Denise, 5957 Poling Road, Lima, $200,000

White, Timothy I/White, Darlene S to Millmine, Wanda, 3695 Citabria Drive, Lima, $225,000

BATH TOWNSHIP

Cunningham, Michael A to Krohn, Luke D, 803 Hefner Drive, Lima, $200,000

Gross, Sara J to McKinley, Jody L, 120 Cheshire Circle, Lima, $150,000

Jenkins, Paul W/Jenkins, Kathy A to Vernon, Matthew T, 1684 Lee Ann Drive, Lima, $174,000

Meyer, Robert H IV Guardian/Bixel, Shirley Marcine to Newman, John D/Newman, Barbara J, 625 Gardenview Circle, Lima, $259,000

Mod Rentals Ltd. to Golden, Jacob, 1307 N. Sugar St., Lima, $7,000

Steiner, Daniel L/Steiner, Barbara A to Barnit LLC, 1201 Findlay Road, Lima, $390,000

BLUFFTON VILLAGE

RSE Rentals LLC at Pridemore, Sarah K, 490 Cherry St., Bluffton, $165,700

DELPHOS CITY

McClure, Bria A to Yelton, Misty Ann/Kawalec, Marcin, 612 E. 2nd St., Delphos, $114,900

Offenbacher, Edward/Offenbacher, Irene to LJ Plescher III, LLC, 126 E. 12th St., Delphos, $41,000

Rivera, Lauretta A & Al/Sheriff Matthew B Treglia to PNC Bank, National Association, 233 N. Franklin St., Delphos, $46,000

Wieging, Kendra S to Nazario, Jamonah R/Shade, Troy M, 513 S. Pierce St., Delphos, $157,000

VILLAGE OF ELIDA

Tomsett, Trinity N to Ogle, James M/Ogle, Tina R, 217 E. Kiracofe Ave., Elida, $119,000

TOWNSHIP OF JACKSON

Lane, Gene M/Lane, Terry E/Lane, Ruth N/Lane, Brenda to Schurr, Christopher F, 3131 N. Napoleon Road, $15,000

Meyer, Cory A/Meyer, Molly to Meyer, Jared/Meyer, Jadyn, 1756 N. Cool Road, Lima, $120,000

Porter, Betty A to Porter, Marcus, 9645 Harding Highway (0.5 acre), Harrod, $20,000

TOWNSHIP OF MONROE

Griffith, Phyllis I to Gariety, Allison A/Burgei, Alexander J, 5495 E. Hook Waltz Road (5.5 acres), Columbus Grove, $180,000

Schumacher, Joseph M Successor Trustee/Schumacher Family Revocable Trust to Knott Family Farms, LLC, Ottawa Road (1.4 acres and 6.48 acres), Columbus Grove, $330,000

TOWNSHIP OF PERRY

Cox, Walter K/Cox, Patricia S to Schaffner, James A, 2136 E. 4th St., Lima, $112,500

Frye, Zachery Thomas/Frye, Brandy to Ernest, Bethany B Trustee/Ernest Income Access Trust, 4505 Amherst Road, Lima, $200,000

Mulholland, Randall W Executor/Estate Of Delphine M Mulholland to Wohlgamuth, Dylan, 3612 E. Hanthorn Road, Lima, $75,000

TOWNSHIP OF SHAWNEE

Bowsher, Jennifer at the Beach, Jeanne M/Beach, Scott D, 1099 Western Ohio Ave., Lima, $170,000

Derryberry, Glenn H/Derryberry, M Jo to Rodolfo, Richardson E/Rodolfo, Marlyn S, 848 Kiowa Trail, Lima, $375,000

Hempfling, Pamela to Nichols, Matthew T, 2041 Maplewood Lane, Lima, $174,900

Jordan, Vicki to Stedke, Daven E./Catahoula Revocable Living Trust, 3550 Dawn Drive, Lima

Lutz, Betty J/Koenig, Jennifer Jean Attorney in fact to Bowsher, Jennifer, 1755 Shawnee Road, Unit 403, Lima, $69,900

Schimpf, Luke T/Schimpf, Kimberley S to Loayza, Carie G, 3145 Juliette Drive, Lima, $201,000

SPENCER TOWNSHIP

Leis, Norma Jean to Hubert, Travis, 11520 Spencerville Road (0.6 acres), Spencerville, $218,000

VILLAGE OF SPENCERVILLE

Hirn, Stephanie/Hirn, Michael P in San Juan, Claudio/Aleman, Cecilia, 328 Brett Lane, Spencerville, $166,300

Jabez Capital Investments, LLC. to Chuffers, Inc., North Broadway Street, Spencerville, $18,700

TOWNSHIP OF SUGAR CREEK

Hemenway, Joanne Y to Ambrister, Laken M, 7154 Gomer Road, Lima, $115,000

]]>
Kirby and the Forgotten Land: All Waddle Dees Hidden in Originull Wasteland https://barsugliafarms.com/kirby-and-the-forgotten-land-all-waddle-dees-hidden-in-originull-wasteland/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 13:14:20 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/kirby-and-the-forgotten-land-all-waddle-dees-hidden-in-originull-wasteland/ In total, Kirby and the Forgotten Land has 18 hidden Waddle Dees to find (not including hidden missions) in Originull Wasteland, the fifth world of Kirby and the Forgotten Land and the first of the game’s second, more difficult island. Kirby and the Forgotten Land will have you replay levels, cycling through them so that […]]]>

In total, Kirby and the Forgotten Land has 18 hidden Waddle Dees to find (not including hidden missions) in Originull Wasteland, the fifth world of Kirby and the Forgotten Land and the first of the game’s second, more difficult island.

Kirby and the Forgotten Land will have you replay levels, cycling through them so that every Waddle Dee is hidden in those tight spaces. Follow our guide to find every hidden Waddle Dee in Originull Wasteland.

All the Waddle Dees hidden in the waste where life began

There are three hidden Waddle Dees in the deserts where life began.

Wastes Where Life Began Waddle Dee 1: Collect all five Star Bits

  • Star Piece 1: In the chest guarded by a snake near the start of the level.
  • Star Piece 2: Hit the four green switches on the platforms above the poison swamp.
  • Star Piece 3: Using Ring Mouth, blow the three windmills on the platforms above the poison.
  • Star Piece 4: In a hidden chest, you need to blast the sand using Ring Mouth to unlock it.
  • Star Piece 5: Defeat Fleurina on the boat.

Waste Where Life Began Waddle Dee 2

At the start of the second stage area, you will see a crack in the ground. Above is a column stuck in a patch of sand.

You’ll need to use the nearby Ring Mouth to blow the sand away and drop the column to break up the ground. The second hidden Waddle Dee hides here.

Waste Where Life Began Waddle Dee 3

You’ll see another cracked floor and column situation soon after. Doing the same here will reveal a door to the hidden area where the final Waddle Dee can be earned.

When you enter, turn right and jump onto the platforms on the right. Once you reach the end, quickly turn around and jump to the platform on your left where the hidden Waddle Dee awaits.

All hidden Waddle Dees in Searching the Oasis

There are five hidden Waddle Dees to save in Searching the Oasis.

Finding the Waddle Dee Oasis 1

The first Waddle Dee of this level can be found a bit further, past the dangerous snake guarding a secret path. Defeat it to continue on the way to a secret pool where the hidden Waddle Dee hangs out.

Finding the Waddle Dee Oasis 2

Past the first Poison Croakom in the level, look right to see a ladder on a tower detached from the main path. Climb on it and navigate three moving platforms to get the second hidden Waddle Dee.

Finding the Waddle Dee Oasis 3

On the other side of the aforementioned moving platforms, there is a dome. Defeat the enemies that spawn in the area, then go Mouthful to the dome to open it. This reveals a ladder up to a large pipe and obstacle course for you to navigate as Pipe Mouth Kirby.

The hidden Waddle Dee is behind a cracked wall at the very end of the section. Make sure to nail the final jump on that last big wooden ramp so you don’t have to do that part again.

Finding the Waddle Dee Oasis 4

The fourth hidden Waddle Dee is in the secret stage room. This is behind the fence which also contains poison. This means you will need Water Balloon Mouth and the Drill ability to enter it.

Once you get there, you’ll need to collect five Green Star Bits. But it’s a speed challenge because every Star Bit is in your way, the path just sinks into poisonous lava.

One of the stacks on a platform always has a Star Bit. So, as a general strategy, you’ll want to dig on the first pile of a platform and work your way up to the last in order to grab whatever was hiding underneath each one.

Search for Waddle Dee Oasis 5

You can find the last Waddle Dee hidden in the level behind the last Poison Croakom. To find out how to solve the riddle of the area and defeat this massive enemy, check out our Originull Wasteland Hidden Mission Guide.

All Waddle Dees Hidden in Alivel Mall (Personal Side)

There are five hidden Waddle Dees to register in the Avel Mall stage (personal side).

Alivel Mall (personal side) Waddle Dee 1

When you find a wall with a bomb block in the center, attack it to reveal a ring you can inhale. Retrace your steps as Ring Mouth Kirby until you find the room with the rotating platforms and a circular hole in the cracked wall. Jump down the hole as Ring Mouth Kirby to rescue the first hidden Waddle Dee.

Alivel Mall (personal side) Waddle Dee 2

Past the platforms above the spikes, you’ll want to inhale a knight for a sword ability. Keep going to your right until you see a fake land attached to a vine.

Cut the vine and drop down to find a vending machine that you’ll need to activate Mouthful mode. Use the portal to teleport to the main level and return to the platforms above the spikes.

Here you will see a rectangular footprint in the wall where you can jump and save the second hidden Waddle Dee.

Alivel Mall (personal side) Waddle Dee 3

In the next area you will find an enemy that you should inhale if you don’t have the Cutter equipped. Climb the ladder to the left and turn right here instead of going through the door. This will take you to a hidden door to a challenge room containing a Wild Bonkers fight.

Once the mini-boss is defeated, you will be rewarded with a hidden Waddle Dee. Be sure to grab the hammer he drops for the next objective.

Alivel Mall (personal side) Waddle Dee 4

Break the cardboard boxes in the next area to reveal a secret area with a stump switch in the upper right corner of the ceiling. Jump up to hit it with the hammer (which you picked up from Wild Bonkers) to drop a ring into the main room.

Inhale it to enter Ring Mode and go back a bit to your left. Earlier, you may have seen a treasure chest hidden in a pile of sand. You’ll want to go back there and blow on it so you can rescue the Waddle Dee hidden inside.

Alivel Mall (personal side) Waddle Dee 5

Stay in Ring Mouth mode and go as far as you can until you find a giant hole in the ground. You will see that you have to cross a rotating platform to reach a hole where you can stand on a side platform on the right. This will open a small room where you can drink water to become Water Balloon Mouth Kirby.

Return to the hole in the ground to find that you will now fit perfectly. This will reveal the last hidden Waddle Dee in the level.

All Waddle Dees hidden in Moonlight Canyon

There are IfI hid Waddle Dees in the Moonlight Canyon level.

Moonlight Canyon Waddle Dee 1

The first hidden Waddle Dee in this return to the mall is in the Light-Bulb Mouth Kirby section that you need to light up. Continue through this section until you find two cannons. You will see a path of coins leading you to the platform where the cannons are.

The secret path behind the second cannon leads to a battery. You need to hold B down to reload it. This will reveal the stairs leading to the first hidden Waddle Dee.

Moonlight Canyon Waddle Dee 2

Later in the Light-Bulb Mouth section, you’ll find the next Waddle Dee near the exit door. Instead of going through it initially, head to a hidden battery that you need to charge. Charging it fully will spawn the hidden Waddle Dee.

Moonlight Canyon Waddle Dee 3

In the next section of the level, you will have to go down to a place with a platform made of blocks that fall under two ladders. Move towards the camera to reveal the hidden Waddle Dee. Carefully navigate the blocks and climb the ladder to the right.

Moonlight Canyon Waddle Dee 4

As you pass falling blocks and upward facing cannons, notice how a block path leads upwards. Follow this to find an opportunity to find Scissor-Lift Kirby. Use the elevator ability to press a blue switch on the ceiling, then dodge the Gordos to head into the now unlocked secret room.

In the room, you must pass enemies on a disappearing bridge. Using the scissor lift muzzle, stay in low mode for the first catwalk. You will need to eject for the next two catwalks where you need to be Kirby. Avoid the Sleep power-ups that will knock you down and head for the hidden Waddle Dee at the end.

Moonlight Canyon Waddle Dee 5

At the end of the Arc Mouth slide section of the level, you will see a pillar crashing down on the right side of the screen. As it falls, there are two holes you can enter to go through it. Enter the right one to find a secret path full of coins and the last hidden Waddle Dee.

That’s all you need to know to find all the hidden Waddle Dees in Originull Wasteland. If you are looking for hidden Waddle Dees in other areas or even hidden missions, check out our other Kirby and the Forgotten Land to guide.

]]>
Land near Hawkhurst offered for sale as vineyard https://barsugliafarms.com/land-near-hawkhurst-offered-for-sale-as-vineyard/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://barsugliafarms.com/land-near-hawkhurst-offered-for-sale-as-vineyard/ If you’ve ever dreamed of ditching your office job and settling down as a winemaker, now’s your chance. Land agents at the BTF Partnership are marketing 94 acres of farmland in the Weald which they say is ideal for planting vines. 94 acres are available at East Heath near Hawkhurst The ground, known as East […]]]>

If you’ve ever dreamed of ditching your office job and settling down as a winemaker, now’s your chance.

Land agents at the BTF Partnership are marketing 94 acres of farmland in the Weald which they say is ideal for planting vines.

94 acres are available at East Heath near Hawkhurst

The ground, known as East Heath, lies south of The Moor in Hawkhurst, with access from Stream Lane.

If someone were to challenge themselves to set up a wine estate there, it would become the third near the village. There is already a vineyard on Heartenoak Road and another on Rye Road on the way to Sandhurst.

Richard Griffiths, parish clerk of Hawkhurst, said: “The village was once a great hop-growing area, perhaps now it will become vineyards.”

The land, which is currently divided into four fields and includes nine acres of woodland, is mainly south and south-east facing and between 15 and 18 meters above sea level.

The soil is a combination of Wealden clay and Tunbridge Wells sand. In recent years it has been cultivated for cereal crops.

The site is marketed by the BTF Partnership
The site is marketed by the BTF Partnership

Richard Thomas, Director of BTF Partnership, said: “The three eastern fields are considered suitable for the establishment of vines as they are well sheltered and south-east facing.

“They’re not too high, which is important because wind can be a problem for growers.

“There are already several established vineyards around the Kent-Sussex border.

“This is one of the largest plots of land suitable for planting vines for sale in this area in some time, and I believe it will attract considerable interest from a variety of buyers.”

The land is for sale with an indicative price of £975,000.

Access is via Stream Lane, southeast of The Moor
Access is via Stream Lane, southeast of The Moor

Parish councilor John Hunt said: “I don’t think the village will have a problem with another vineyard.

“It’s agricultural use, not heavy traffic use.”

There are at least 22 working vineyards in Kent, from Sevenoaks to Canterbury and from Tonbridge to Folkestone. Many are centered around Ashford and along the North Downs.

One of the best known is the award-winning Chapel Down Vineyard 12 miles away in Tenterden.

Ben Woodchurch of Chapel Down said: “The Wealden clay wouldn’t be ideal from a drainage point of view, but the sand would be good. It’s its southerly orientation that’s important and the height is correct.”

What the land planted with vines might look like
What the land planted with vines might look like

Mr Woodchurch said: “The best soil is on the chalk of the North Downs, where we have a number of vineyards.

“A lot of landowners, when they come to sell now, because there’s more awareness of the wine industry, suggest that their land might be suitable for a vineyard, when maybe a few years ago, they wouldn’t have thought of that.”

]]>